7 Best Foods for Your Puppy, Adult or Senior Siberian Husky

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Your Siberian Husky is unusually fuel-efficient, needing about 30-40% less food than other comparably-sized dog breeds.

Let’s find the best dog food for your Siberian Husky.

These athletic, hardworking dogs were first bred by the Chukchi people of the Siberian Arctic. Medium-sized, active, and tenacious, these companions fit in well with the Chukchi’s nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyle. Siberian Huskies lived with these Eastern Siberian people for around 4,000 years before arriving in North America around the turn of the last century.

Initially dubbed “Siberian Rats” by Americans accustomed to their heavier, longer-legged Malamutes, these Siberian dogs quickly earned a reputation for athleticism, endurance, and strength.

In 1910, a team of Siberian Huskies won the 408-mile All Alaska Sweepstakes race. In 1925, a diphtheria outbreak gripped the town of Nome, Alaska. A relay of Siberian Huskies was tasked with the urgent job of returning a life-saving anti-diphtheria serum from 600 miles away. The perilous and heroic run through frigid temperatures, buffeting winds, and blowing snow earned these dogs and their mushers a respected place in history.

In 1930, the Siberian Husky breed was officially recognized by the American Kennel Club.

The Siberian Husky’s heritage is obvious in the modern dog. Their desire to live within a pack hierarchy, tolerance of cold, willingness to work, spirited personality, and physical strength are ice-clear reflections of their tough Arctic roots.

Their breeding is also evident in their dietary needs and attitude towards food.

In this article, we’ll take a look at what makes the Siberian Husky different from other dogs in terms of health concerns, natural eating habits, and the types of diets that satisfy these needs. Keep reading to find our picks for the top 7 best dog foods for every stage of your Siberian Husky’s life. You’ll find the best foods for puppies, adults, and seniors.

What makes a great food for Siberian Huskies?

Siberian Huskies are considered medium-sized dogs, putting them in the same size category as Australian Shepherds, Boxers, and Vizslas. They reach 20-23” at the shoulder and weigh between 35-60 lbs as adults.

During a long trip across the Siberian Arctic, these dogs might not be able to eat two hearty meals per day, but they still had to perform at their peak. They were bred for endurance and the ability to thrive when food wasn’t always readily available. For your Siberian Husky’s ancestors, a typical day might involve hours of vigorous work followed by a small portion of high-protein, high-fat, calorie-dense meat.

Less active or senior dogs may need as few as 1,000 calories per day, while highly active Siberian Huskies could consume 1,800 calories daily. This typically equates to 1.5 – 2 cups of a high-quality, nutritionally dense kibble.

Huskies don’t need a lot of carbohydrates. This includes grains and fillers. Look for foods with minimal plant content and a healthy concentration of fresh, wholesome named meat ingredients; avoid byproducts.

Part of being bred to consume only small portions of nutritionally dense food is that unlike most dogs, who will eagerly gobble up almost anything that’s set before them, your Siberian Husky might skip meals or grow finicky about their food. They tend to eat more after exercise and not eat much on inactive days.

Like humans, many Siberian Huskies appreciate dietary variety. Diving into an identical kibble bowl day after day can get old. These dogs like to mix it up with new flavors and textures.

What are the unique health concerns of the Siberian Husky?

Choosing the best dog foods for this breed requires an understanding of the health issues they face. The best food addresses these common concerns, keeping your dog healthy.

Eye Problems

Siberian Huskies have a tendency to develop eye problems.

These problems include:

  • Cataracts – any opacity of the eye lens. Cataracts are painless, but can lead to loss of vision. This condition can occur for a number of reasons and is associated with the late stages of PRA (Progressive Retinal Atrophy). Most cataracts in dogs are inherited and can occur at any age. In Siberian Huskies, they typically occur in the back of the lens. Antioxidant supplementation can help to manage this condition. According to a 1999 study of 1,345 Siberian Huskies, 8% of the examined dogs had inheritable cataracts.
  • Corneal Dystrophy – this inherited condition affects the cornea and causes clouding of the eyes. In later stages, it can manifest as crystals or gray-brown deposits deeper in the cornea. While most dogs can still see fairly well in spite of the disorder, some suffer from severe vision loss. In the above-mentioned study, 4% of the Siberian Huskies had corneal dystrophy.
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy – a condition most often found in male Siberian Huskies. PRA causes the rod photoreceptors to die, leading to night blindness. Without specific daily antioxidant supplementation, the condition can lead to total blindness within one year of diagnosis. While the disease has no cure, daily antioxidant supplementation can help to slow its progress, allowing affected dogs to keep their vision for years.
  • Glaucoma – this disorder involves cell-produced fluid in the eye not draining properly. This fluid normally moves into the bloodstream, but in dogs with glaucoma, it builds up in the eye. This condition is painful and can lead to blindness. Fortunately, this condition is less common among Siberian Huskies than the other three mentioned above.

What type of diet can help keep Siberian Huskies’ eyes healthy?

Since these conditions tend to be hereditary, having a conversation with your breeder will help to ensure that your Siberian Husky won’t develop these eye problems later in life. Choose a reputable breeder with a history of producing dogs with healthy eyes.

That said, you can’t always prevent these conditions through good breeding, and diet can help to encourage ocular health.

A diet rich in nutritious vitamins like A, C, and E can help to encourage continued eye health, as does the inclusion of Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly DHA.

Zinc Responsive Dermatosis

Zinc responsive dermatosis affects dogs in three forms. Type one is most common among Siberian Huskies and Malamutes. This skin condition involves poor intestinal absorption of dietary zinc. Despite getting enough zinc through their diet, afflicted dogs show symptoms of zinc deficiency, including crusted, scaly skin lesions and a dull, dry coat.

What type of diet can help prevent zinc responsive dermatosis in Siberian Huskies?

While this is a hereditary condition, it can be exacerbated or caused by too much or too little zinc in the diet during growth. It’s important to always feed a balanced diet without excess supplementation. Another important thing to look at is making sure that your dog isn’t consuming any supplements that could interfere with zinc absorption.

If your Siberian Husky has been diagnosed with the condition, a high-zinc diet or zinc supplements can help. Plant-based antioxidants and calcium bind to zinc and can keep it from being properly absorbed by your dog’s body, so it’s a good idea to choose supplements carefully and avoid excess plant content in your dog’s food.

Lactose Intolerance

Siberian Huskies are typically lactose intolerant. Whether choosing a commercial dog food or preparing a homemade diet for your dog, it’s important to avoid foods that are high in lactose, like milk, ice cream, and some cheeses.

Here’s a chart showing the lactose content of common dairy products.

Taking all of these needs into consideration, here are our picks for the top 7 best dog foods for Siberian Huskies.

Top 2 Best Puppy Foods for Siberian Huskies

Siberian Husky puppies should be weaned when they’re between three and seven weeks of age. When they start consuming solid food, Siberian Huskies will likely need to eat three meals a day. Like their parents and grandparents, Siberian Husky puppies require quality nutrition – high-protein foods made primarily from animal ingredients. It’s important that they receive complete nutrition from foods designed for growth or all life stages.

Orijen Puppy Formula Review

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

First 5 Ingredients: Fresh chicken meat, fresh turkey meat, fresh whole eggs, fresh whole herring, fresh chicken liver

Orijen puppy food is a great choice for your Siberian Husky because it delivers pure, unadulterated animal protein. Nourishing protein makes up an impressive 38% of the food, with just 17% carbohydrates.

Two-thirds of the meat in this product is fresh or raw. The remaining ⅓ of the meat has been air-dried at about 194 degrees Fahrenheit. This low-temperature processing locks in the nutritional value of the meat.

What’s more, all of the meat ingredients are offered in WholePrey™ ratios, meaning that your Siberian Husky gets the same ratios of meat, cartilage, and organs that they might find in the wild.

Because the minimally-processed meat is so nutrient-rich, this complete and balanced food doesn’t need a lot of added vitamins and minerals. Zinc is the only supplement used in Orijen puppy food.

Pros

  • Ultra nutrient-dense food made from 85% meat
  • Contains minimal carbohydrate content, including corn, soy, and wheat
  • No byproducts or artificial ingredients
  • Made with WholePrey™ ratios, delivering balanced quantities of muscle meat, organs, and cartilage

Cons

  • An expensive dog food

Instinct by Nature’s Variety Raw Boost Puppy Grain-Free Review

Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars

First 5 Ingredients: Chicken, Chicken Meal, Turkey Meal, Peas, Chickpeas

This nutritionally-dense food is designed to support puppyhood growth. It is a solid source of animal protein with chicken, chicken meal, and turkey meal leading the ingredient list, plus appetizing morsels of freeze-dried raw chicken.

These nutritionally-packed nuggets offer a hassle-free way to offer your dog the flavor and nourishment of raw food – plus they add variety to your Siberian Husky’s diet.

The recipe incorporates DHA from chicken eggs – this fatty acid helps to support healthy brain and eye development, setting the stage for a healthy adult Siberian Husky.

This food is made without grains or corn, soy, or wheat. It’s free of byproducts and fillers, as well as any artificial colors and preservatives.

Pros

  • Rich in real animal protein
  • Contains morsels of freeze-dried raw chicken
  • Made without byproducts, fillers, or artificial colors and preservatives
  • Free of corn, soy, and wheat
  • Supplemented with DHA for brain and eye development

Cons

  • According to some reviews, the concentration of freeze-dried raw nuggets is inconsistent from bag to bag

Top 3 Best Adult Dog Foods for Siberian Huskies

Adult Siberian Huskies are typically lively, independent, and spirited. It’s as important as ever to offer nutritionally-dense food made from high-quality ingredients.

Ziwi Peak Daily-Dog Venison Cuisine Grain-Free Air-Dried Dog Food Review

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

First 5 Ingredients: Venison – Meat (Includes Up to 3% Finely Ground Bone), Venison – Liver, Lung, Tripe, Heart and Kidney, New Zealand Green-Lipped Mussel, Lecithin, Chicory Inulin

Ziwi Peak Daily-Dog Venison Cuisine Grain-Free Air-Dried Dog Food

This unconventional air-dried food is like jerky for dogs and contains 98% meat, organs, and finely ground bone, plus glucosamine and chondroitin rich green-lipped mussel. As you’ve guessed, that remaining 2% doesn’t leave much room for low-value fillers. This is one of the most nutritionally-dense foods that you can give your dog – perfect for the Siberian Husky.

Ziwi Peak food delivers the nutritional strength of raw food and the convenience of dry kibble.

This limited-ingredient food is simply made with two meat or seafood ingredients: venison and green-lipped mussel. In addition to skipping common problem meats, this recipe omits other common offenders like dairy, corn, soy, and wheat.

Pros

  • Limited ingredient list makes this food an ideal choice for dogs with food sensitivities and allergies
  • Ultra-dense food is perfect for the Siberian Husky’s light appetite
  • Free from low-value ingredients like grains and other fillers
  • Doesn’t contain any artificial colors, flavors, or preservatives
  • Free from byproducts

Cons

  • An expensive dog food

Orijen 6 Fish Grain-Free Formula Dry Dog Food Review

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

First 5 Ingredients: Whole Atlantic Mackerel, Whole Atlantic Herring, Whole Atlantic Flounder, Whole Acadian Redfish, Atlantic Monkfish

Orijen 6 Fish Grain-Free Formula Dry Dog Food

With its stunning concentration of whole animal ingredients in WholePrey™ ratios, this food delivers concentrated nutrition in the form your Siberian Husky was made to consume. Protein-rich fish makes up 80% of the food. Two-thirds of the meat in this food is fresh or raw, and the remaining third of that meat is dehydrated at around 194°F. This low-heat processing locks in the nutritional value of the food, in part making it possible for this recipe to include only minimal vitamin and mineral supplementation.

The rest of the recipe includes nourishing fruits, vegetables, and botanicals chosen for their nutritional value.

It contains natural marine-sourced EPA and DHA to support a healthy skin and coat as well as critical eye health.

This nutritionally-dense food is made without any fillers, byproducts, or artificial ingredients and all of its ingredients were sustainably farmed or fished in the United States.

Pros

  • Extraordinarily nutrient-dense and packed with ultra-accessible meat protein
  • Low in carbohydrates
  • Free of fillers, byproducts, and artificial ingredients
  • Made in the United States from regional ingredients

Cons

  • A high-priced dog food
  • Some reviewers state that it has an overly fishy aroma

Primal Chicken Formula Nuggets Grain-Free Freeze-Dried Dog Food Review

Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars

First 5 Ingredients: Chicken, Chicken Necks, Chicken Gizzards, Organic Kale, Organic Carrots

Primal Chicken Formula Nuggets Grain-Free Freeze-Dried Dog Food

If you’re interested in a food not violated by high-heat processing, but don’t want to deal with the hassle of preparing raw food, these nuggets offer a more convenient solution.

The food features a freeze-dried mixture of raw chicken muscle meat, bones, and organs blended with other ingredients chosen for their nutritional value. The recipe incorporates cold-water salmon oil as a natural source of Omega-3 fatty acids, plus coconut oil, which is rich in short and medium-chain fatty acids, which can help support digestive health. It uses fresh produce to deliver important vitamins A, B-complex, D, and C while relying on organic supplements to help with digestion.

Pros

  • Made in the USA
  • Made from at least 77% high-quality meat
  • Free from byproducts, fillers, and artificial ingredients

Cons

  • Freeze dried food can be somewhat time-consuming to prepare – you’ll need to rehydrate it before serving each meal
  • It’s recommended that you wash your hands and all food preparation surfaces after serving your dog this food

Top 2 Best Senior Dog Foods for Siberian Huskies

As your Siberian Husky’s activity levels and metabolism slow down, it’s important to prevent unwanted weight gain. While a high-quality diet is important throughout life, it’s critical to avoid fillers and excess carbohydrates as your dog ages.

Orijen Senior Grain-Free Dog Food Review

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

First 5 Ingredients: Deboned Chicken, Deboned Turkey, Yellowtail Flounder, Whole Eggs, Whole Atlantic Mackerel

By using fresh freeze-dried or dehydrated muscle meat, cartilage, bones, and organs, Orijen senior food offers hearty nutrition in its most biologically available form for your Siberian Husky.

This food features an impressive 85% animal content  and the remaining 15% of this food is comprised of nutritious, low-glycemic fruits and vegetables, each one chosen for its nutritional value.

To suit senior dogs, this protein-packed food keeps the calorie count low. This recipe is free of anything artificial and doesn’t contain by-products, fillers, or grains.

Pros

  • Supports a healthy senior weight
  • Unusually rich in real animal protein
  • No fillers, byproducts, or artificial ingredients
  • Contains glucosamine and chondroitin for joint health

Cons

  • On the expensive end of the spectrum

Instinct by Nature’s Variety Raw Boost Senior Grain-Free Recipe with Real Chicken Dry Dog Food Review

Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars

First 5 Ingredients: Chicken Meal (source of Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate), Chickpeas, Peas, Tapioca, Chicken

This food has all of the fundamental characteristics of a good food for senior dogs. It contains glucosamine and chondroitin to keep the the joints in good condition, along with minimal carbohydrate content to keep weight under control.

This food gets a boost from morsels of raw chicken, delivering nutritious enzymes that would have been stripped away during high-heat processing.

The recipe also scores points with several other senior dog-focused additions. The inclusion of natural DHA from chicken eggs helps to support continued brain and eye health, while added L-carnitine helps to burn fat, keeping your Siberian Husky trim and healthy.

Pros

  • Contains nourishing chunks of freeze-dried raw meat
  • Free of artificial colors, flavors, and preservatives
  • Doesn’t contain any corn, soy, or wheat – grain-free
  • Contains glucosamine and chondroitin to support continued joint health
  • Contains L-carnitine to discourage fat deposits
  • Supports continued brain and eye health

Cons

  • Contains protein-rich peas, raising the biologically unavailable protein content of the food

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